Great News!!!!! Picture

Great News everyone!!!

Now Coy Photography has finally found it’s new home in Here you’ll see more tips, tutorials, and resources “made easy” by random experts to make your whole Digital Photography experience more than just a relaxing hobby, but something you can be proud of too.

I know learning photography isn’t that simple, but with my new blog I’m sure you’ll find it a lot more easier, and a lot more fun than the usual.

Coy of

In the new blog I give you tips, tricks, features, information, photographers and their works, and a whole lot more about photography, and the digital side of it.

Hope to see you there.

The Red Eye – Cause and Prevention

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Have you ever wondered ‘what causes the Red-Eye in digital photographs?’

Here’s a couple of things you should know to understand it.

The real cause of the red eye is the flash of the camera. Red-eye occurs when light from the built-in flash of a camera bounces off the subject’s retinas and reflects back to the camera lens. The flashlight takes on the tint of the blood vessels in the eye, which causes the eyes to appear to be glowing red in the picture.

Red-eye can result from any camera with a built-in flash, not just a digital camera. It’s because a built-in flash is positioned very close to the camera lens. When people look into the lens, they’re also looking directly at the flash, which means that their retinas pick up and reflect almost all of the light from the flash. When you use an external flash head, you can position the flash farther from the lens and also angle the flash so that it’s not aimed directly at the eyes.

Yes, I agree we can’t avoid the flash specially when the natural light of the room is not bright enough. So what can be the remedy? Well, we’ve not much choice but to rely on the software that help edit digital photographs. Pretty much any digital photographic software will do the job.

And some caeras have RedEye reduction features also.

Some of the tactics I generally use to prevent red-eye are:

(a) Turn on as many lights as you can – especially in indoor photo-shoots. This helps to neutralise the light in the room with that of flash of the camera.

(b) If it’s daytime, try to place the subject near to a window where the sunlight is in direct contact with the subject. This also help prevent shadows been generated on the photograph.

(c) Finally, switch the flash to red-light reduction mode. This feature is present on most digital cameras. It’s good to read the manual before hand so that you’ll have a good understanding of your camera. Remember it’s always good to learn the ‘rules’ before you play with the toy…

Well then good luck with your ‘click’ … ‘clicks’..

The following site is a good tutor for the beginners who are paranoid about the red-eye syndrome to test & try. Its simple and easy to follow steps are very encouraging to try & rectifying the error youself.

Some tips to remove Red-Eye from digital phtotos

Amazing Photography Blogs II

11. Brook Pifer

12. Deceptive Media

13. The Narrative

14. Mute

15. Joe’s NYC


17. Orbit1

18. Thinsite

19. Stuck in Customs


High Speed Photography

The photo is taken by fotoopa.


A Splash


Sound-triggered high-speed flash photography
These experiments were performed as part of the 2008 Astro-Science Workshop of the Adler Planetarium in Chicago, IL.


The Red And The Blue
The photo is taken by Paul Hocksenar.


Cherry Drop
Photo by Brian Davies.




Ghirlanda Colore
The photo is taken by Antonino Dattola.


Water Sphere


Popping Balloons
The photo is taken by Rob Hilken.






Apple Water Splash
Photo by linden.g.


Speedy burst water balloon
“Awesome and interesting shot of a water balloon being popped. I’ve never seen a planet blow up, but this is how I imagine it would look.”


Water Sound Figures
Photo by linden.g.




Smashed (and burning) bulb
The photo is taken by Peter Wienerroither from the University of Wien, Austria.


Rising Up
Photo by James Neeley.



Strange Brew
Photo by Ray Edgar.


Shattered Glass
“This photo perfectly freezes the moment between the breaking of the bulb and the tungsten filaments (thereby breaking the source of light), it’s a sort of limbo captured.”


Unknown (?)


High Speed Milk Drop


Shower Cap





3 Waterbaloons


Milk and Coffee
The photo is taken by Andreas Stridsberg.


Bullet Pictures


Red Light Bulb
Photo by spyzter.


Pabst + Hollow Point


Water Dart
Photo by Adam Connah.


Nebarnix High-speed photography set





EV (Exposure Value) Compensation Explained


I’ve been using the EV (Exposure Value) button on my camera more than any of the other buttons so I thought I would share with you why and when I use it. Remember that I shoot with a Nikon so shutter speed and aperture are controlled with the front and back wheels not buttons😉. But before I get into that, let me briefly explain to you WHAT the EV button is and what it does.

To put it simply, the EV button allows your to quickly underexpose (darken) or overexpose (brighten) your image. How it works is pretty simple. When you’re taking a photo, the camera’s job is to adjust itself by changing the shutter speed and/or apperture to properly expose your shot so that it’s not too bright or too dark. Some cameras do this better than others but that’s another story.😉 When you play with the EV button, what you’re doing is telling the camera to either brighten or darken the photo from the optimal exposure it perceives.

You can use the EV button in P (programed auto), S or Tv (shutter priority) or A (aperture priority) modes.

In P mode, the camera will adjust the EV by changing the shutter speed and/or the apperture. In S/Tv mode, since you set the shutter speed manually, it will adjust the aperture to compensate. In A mode, the camera will change the shutter speed since you manually control the apperture.

NB: You cannot use the EV button to under or overexpose your photo in M (manual) mode since you control both the shutter speed and aperture manually.

Let’s look at an example together. The 1st shot is without EV compensation, in other words how the camera sees proper exposure. I shot in Aperture Priority so my aperture stays the same so I’ll only note (for curiosity’s sake) the shutter speed changes that the camera selected. This shot is at 1/640 sec.


Using the EV button I selected +1 EV and got this shot at 1/320 sec.


At +2 EV the shutter speed was at 1/160 sec.


I then underexposed my shot by -1 EV and this is the result. The shutter speed went to 1/1250 sec.


At -2 EV the shutter speed was at 1/2500 sec.


So, as you can see, the camera adjusted the shutter speed to let in more or less light to fulfill my request.

When to Use EV Compensation

You’re probably thinking to yourself: “Great! Now I understand how to use the EV compensation button. Super! OK… when do I need to use this? You say you use it all the time? You don’t think the camera is smart enough for you?” Alright then. Let’s talk about when to use it. I can’t go through all the situations but let me explain a few most common ones.

Your camera has a tendency to over/underexpose:

I had this issue with my Nikon D200. The camera seemed to overexpose by roughly 0.3 EV most of the time. So what I did to fix the problem was to set my EV at -0.3 and the problem was solved for general optimal exposures. Simple as that.

You need more shutter speed:

I often shoot birds and those suckers can move pretty fast sometimes and to freeze their movement I need as high a shutter speed as I can. And if their also far away and I’m at my full 400mm on my Nikkor 80-400mm VR I need speed to reduce or eliminate blur from camera shake. The first thing I do is go into A mode and set my aperture wide open (smallest number) to get the most light. Then I bring my EV down by roughly 0.7. I would rather have a crisp darker shot that I can easily recalibrate in post processing than having a properly exposed blurry shot.🙂

Your subject is brighter/darker than your background:

When I shot the flower above my subject took most of the frame so the exposure was spot on. But sometimes your subject will be smaller, like a bird in a tree. Let’s say you’re shooting a bright yellow bird perched in a dark green tree and the bird only takes up 1/10th or less of the frame because you’re too cheap to buy that Canon 800mm IS, The Sigma 800mm or that Nikkor 600mm😉, what your camera does is get a general metering of the frame and adjusts the EV accordingly (we could talk about camera metering controls but that’s another article altogether!). What will happen is the your dark green tree will be properly exposed since it takes up most of the frame which means your little bird will be overexposed and therefore lose all it’s detail. You’ll have a little white spot where the bird is. Not exactly what we want. So with the flip of a button you then underexpose your shot by -1 EV and see if you get the details back. If it’s still not enough bring it down lower until your bird is properly exposed. It’s quick and easy. And of course you can apply this to a dark subject on a bright background to get details back by bringing up your EV.

Top photo is normally exposed. Bottom photo is exposed at -1.3 EV


Bright sky:

So you’re shooting this lovely landscape with a beautiful blue sky and poofy white clouds and you forgot your graduated ND filter. Shoot! Ah, but you do have your tripod so you set it up, frame your shot and take the 1st shot at normal exposure. Most of the time (depending on your composition) the land will be properly exposed and the blue sky turns white (overexposed). Darn! What to do? Underexpose your shot (by using the EV button of course) until your sky is nice and blue. Having used a tripod, my composition is the same so I can easily stitch the land and the sky together in Photoshop™ to make the perfectly exposed photo. Or use the HDR technique. Yes you can also do this by setting up your camera to bracket your exposure but that’s way too long to do in the menus compared to just pressing a button and turning a dial.🙂

So there you go! The mysteries of the EV compensation button are no more.🙂

If you use the EV button in other situations, please post them here to share them with us.

Shutter Release Technique


Situation from: Digital Photography School

“Thanks for your tip on using the Continuous Shooting Darren. I use it on my DSLR regularly but have one problem – I always end up taking more shots than I want to. I put my finger down on the shutter button and before I know it I’ve taken a whole heap of shots. Any suggestions?”

Thanks for the question Harold – unfortunately there’s no easy answer to this problem except to use the old adage – ‘practice makes perfect’.

I know the problem you have because when I first discovered continuous shooting mode on my old film SLR I had the same problem and could quite easily go through a 36 exposure roll very quickly (an expensive problem). The way I got over it was to practice shooting in burst mode without any film in the camera. As I did that I learnt how much pressure it took to take one, two, three or more shots. Of course with a digital camera you can practice as you go without having to pay for unneccessary shots.

The best advice I can give when taking a shot in continuous mode (or in any mode for that matter) is to work hard at gently applying pressure to your shutter button rather than jabbing at it.

Someone once told me that it’s the same principle with shooting a gun (not that I’m too familiar with that). Rather than jabbing at the trigger and pulling yourself off aim you gentle squeeze it to keep the gun steady.

Using this technique with a camera will give you more control in continuous shooting mode to take the amount of shots you want and will also have the added benefit of keeping your camera still and reducing camera shake.

Lastly – don’t press the shutter with the very tip of your finger – rather use the flat part of it so that the end section of your finger is almost horizontal at the time of releasing the shutter (as pictured). This will help you to have as much control as possible and will also reduce camera shake.

DSLRs or Compact Cameras

THE FIRST AND MOST IMPORTANT CHOICE a new photographer makes is which camera to use. But walk into any shop or browse to any online supplier, and the variety of different makes and styles are completely overwhelming.

Luckily, there is an easier way than evaluating every model in every conceivable price class.

Cameras come in two main categories: compact and SLR, and by choosing which of these is right for you, you can significantly narrow the choice, making the selection process a lot simpler.

Let’s look at each of these in turn:

Advantages of using a Digital Single-Lens Reflex camera

Digital Single-Lens Reflex Cameras

A single-lens reflex camera can be identified by the fact that the lens and body come in two separate pieces. The lenses can be bought individually and are interchangeable for specific brands of cameras. This is a tremendous advantage and means that the range of capabilities of the camera can be extended over time, such as with longer telephoto lenses or lenses that allow you to take close-up pictures.

In fact, SLRs are better thought of as the centerpiece of a system, rather than as a complete package in its own right. There is an incredible number of accessories and attachments, such as flashguns and filters, dedicated to expanding the range of capabilities of your SLR.

The advantages of using a DSLR

As mentioned above, an SLR is more extendable than its compact cousins. It allows the photographer greater control over how the final image looks. Quite apart from the fact that there are more accessories available, an SLR will generally allow the photographer more control over basic camera controls, such as shutter speed, aperture and ISO selection. Whereas compacts will normally automatically adjust these settings according to a built in algorithm, SLRs will allow the photographer to set each individually, while still including the option of letting the camera operate in automatic mode. Furthermore, while most compacts will only operate in autofocus mode, an SLR will allow the user to manually focus the lens.

Because SLRs are extendable with a variety of lenses and accessories, they are also more versatile, and can be used in a variety of situations. The larger sensor sizes means that less image noise is generated in low light and that the photographer has better control over depth of field, with larger apertures throwing more of the background out of focus than is possible on the smaller Compacts.

Though this is a gross generalization, the image quality generated by SLR lenses are far superior to that available from Compacts. Of course, some Compacts are better than others and not every lens made for the SLR market is of equally high standard, but dedicated lenses at the middle to top end of the market are vastly more reliable and suffer from far fewer aberrations (or flaws) than those built into compact cameras.

One slightly archaic difference between SLRs and Compacts used to be that in a Compact the user does not actually look through the lens of the camera when taking the picture. Rather, the viewfinder was slightly of center, meaning that there was always the possibility of falling foul of a parallax error when taking the picture. Today, most compacts do allow the user to see exactly what the lens sees, but not through the viewfinder, rather by displaying the image as it will appear on the rear display of the camera. Though this is a vast improvement over the previous situation, it is not without flaws, and the image displayed on the back of the camera can often be quite faint and hard to discern in bright light. The large, clear viewfinders found on DSLRs still have the advantage.

Advantages of using a Digital Single-Lens Reflex camera

The advantages of using a Compact Camera

Firstly and undeniably, Compacts are cheaper. Not only is the amount needed to buy the camera far lower, but there is also much less scope for and need to buy accessories, meaning that you will spend far less over time.

Perhaps the biggest advantage of Compact cameras, price aside, is the fact that they are just that: compact. The small size and light weight mean that you can take it anywhere and that you are much more likely to be able to carry it with you when going on a long trip or in your pocket or purse as you go about your day to day business.

Similarly, Compacts may be a faster option if you need to take a picture in a hurry. With a DSLR and a wide range of lenses, it may take you several minutes to set yourself up. If all you want to do is take a quick snap, or if time is of the essence, you may be much better of reaching for a “point-and-shoot”.

Compacts also attract far less attention than bulky black SLRs. Virtually everyone has a little camera stashed away somewhere, and with one of these you can take pictures without anyone giving you a second glance. With an SLR in your hands, you are making a statement, you are declaring to the world that you are there to take a picture, and you shouldn’t be surprised if people took notice. Often when you visit music concerts or stage productions, the ushers will allow those with compact cameras through, but stop those carrying DSLRs.

The smaller sensor size of Compact cameras also mean it will have much more depth of field in low light and it enables most models to have a built-in close-up facility.

Some may also say that Compacts are easier to use, and as the “point-and-shoot” nickname suggests, in most cases it’s simply a matter of turning it on and pressing the shutter release button. This ease of use does come at the price of limiting the control the user has over the final image, though.

Finally, because the lens is never removed from a Compact camera, there is no opportunity for dust to get in and get stuck to the sensor, this is a common problem with SLRs, and the dust can be notoriusly hard to remove.

Which is right for you? DSLR or Compact

In the great vast world of photography, there is a place for both these formats, all you need to decide is which best suit your needs.

As a general rule, SLRs are used by those who are fairly serious about their photography. Whether as hobbyists or professionals, they are willing to take the time to master the camera and its controls in order to get the best possible images.

Compacts, on the other hand, are used by those who just want a quick snap, who want to get the job done without the hassle of changing lenses or adjusting the shutter speed.

That is not to say that professionals and serious amateurs never use Compact cameras. On the contrary, I know more photographers who have a Compact sitting right alongside their SLR than who don’t, but the fact is that they would use these two cameras in different situations. When they need to get the best picture they possibly can, they will use the SLR, but when on holiday with the family, they might use the happy-snap camera, same as everyone else.

Advantages of using a Digital Single-Lens Reflex camera

Prosumers, Superzooms and Hybrids

This eclectic variety of names all describe the same thing. They all refer to the dirty love-child of the two types of cameras we dealt with above.

What these cameras aim to do is to bring together features of both SLRs and Compacts giving you the best of both worlds. What you end up with, however is a camera that spectacularly combines the worst of all possibilities. It is larger and heavier than a compact, yet have none of the extendibility of an SLR. The lenses offer a huge zoom range, sometimes as much as 20x optical, but the glass is generally of very poor quality and images suffer badly, especially due to chromatic aberration (meaning that different colors come into focus at different places on the image, resulting in the edges of subject detail having a colored fringe, commonly purple).

Furthermore, the degree of control over the final the image is often quite limited compared to an SLR, while the ease of use and speed of the Compact is sacrificed at the same time. The camera is also more expensive than a Compact but of much lower quality than an SLR.

In short, these are not worth the plastic they are made of, and only serve one single purpose: to teach those with more money than sense a lesson.

Buy one at your peril.

Source: Illustrated Photography